Forgone dental care due to cost (all ages)

Minnesotans with forgone dental care by:

 

Minnesotans with forgone dental care due to cost, 2011 to 2017

 
 

 

Total sample size (2011) = 11,355, (2013) = 11,778, (2015) = 11,178 Population estimates were based on the state’s population: (2011) = 5,348,562, (2013) = 5,418,521, (2015) = 5,482,435 and (2017) = 5,576,606 as shown in U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division; Table 1. Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for the United States, Regions, States, and Puerto Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2017 (NST-EST2017-01). Statistical weights were applied to forgone dental care rates to ensure that survey results are representative of the state’s population. About the Minnesota Health Access Survey data for more information.

 

In 2011, 17% of Minnesotans reported not receiving needed dental care due to cost. This dropped to 12% in 2013 and 2015, but rose to 14% in 2017.


 

Minnesotans with forgone dental care due to cost by age group, 2017

 
 

 

Total sample size = 12,436. Statistical weights were applied to forgone dental care rates to ensure that survey results are representative of the state’s population. See About the Minnesota Health Access Survey data for more information.

 

In 2017, 23% of Minnesotans aged 26 to 34 years reported not being able to get needed dental care due to cost.


 

Minnesotans with forgone dental care due to cost by race and ethnicity, 2017

 
 

 

All race or ethnicity categories include individuals who report their race or ethnicity alone or in combination with another race or ethnicity. Total sample size = 12,436. Statistical weights were applied to forgone dental care rates to ensure that survey results are representative of the state’s population. See About the Minnesota Health Access Survey data for more information.

 

In 2017, 21% of Hispanic, 16% of American Indian, 15% of White, 14%  of Black and and 10% of Asian Minnesotans were unable to get needed dental care due to costs.


 

Minnesotans with forgone dental care due to cost by education, 2017

 
 

 

For children, education level refers to that of the parent. Total sample size = 12,436. Statistical weights were applied to forgone dental care rates to ensure that survey results are representative of the state’s population. See About the Minnesota Health Access Survey data for more information.

 

In 2017, Minnesotans with less than a college degree (21% less than high school education and 16%  high school degree and some college education, each) reported higher rates of forgone dental care due to cost, compared to those with a college degree and beyond (11% college graduate and 9% (post college education).


 

Minnesotans with foregone dental care due to cost by Federal Poverty Level, 2017

 
 

 

Total sample size = 12,436. The Department of Health and Human Services defines the Federal Poverty Guidelines each year for eligibility purposes of certain programs and benefits. Those above 400% of the federal poverty guidelines have more income than those at or below 100%. Statistical weights were applied to forgone dental care rates to ensure that survey results are representative of the state’s population. See About the Minnesota Health Access Survey data for more information.

 

In 2017, 20% of Minnesotans 200% or below of the federal povety guidelines (FPG) (lower income levels), 18% of Minnesotans 201 to 300% of the FPG and 15% of Minnesotans 301 to 400% of the FPG were unable to get needed dental care due to cost, compared to 9% of Minnesotans at or above 400% FPG.

In 2017, a family of four at 200% of the federal poverty guidelines had a total yearly income of $49,200.


 

Minnesotans with forgone dental care due to cost by dental insurance status, 2017

 
 

 

Total sample size = 12,436. Statistical weights were applied to forgone dental care rates to ensure that survey results are representative of the state’s population. See About the Minnesota Health Access Survey data for more information.

 

In 2017, among Minnesotans without dental insurance, 27% did not receive needed dental care due to cost, compared to 10%of Minnesotans with dental insurance.

Among those who did not have health insurance, 35.3% reported forgone dental care. Among those who did have health insurance coverage, 17.4% with individual coverage, 16.4% with public coverage and 10.4% with group coverage reported forgone dental care.


 

Minnesotans with forgone dental care due to cost by urban and rural residence, 2017

 
 

 

Total sample size = 12,436. Rural and urban classifications are based on Rural/Urban Commuting-Area taxonomy (RUCA-zip) developed by University of Washington, Rural Health Research Center and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Statistical weights were applied to forgone dental care rates to ensure that survey results are representative of the state’s population. See About the Minnesota Health Access Survey data for more information.

 

In 2017, there were no urban-rural differences in forgone dental care. Fifteen percent of urban, 13% of large rural city or town residents, and 15% of small rural town and isolated small rural town residents were unable to receive needed dental care due to cost.