Dental insurance

Minnesotans without dental insurance by:

Dental insurance helps individuals and families obtain dental care

The 2007 National Association of Dental Plans Consumer Survey found that individuals without dental insurance were:

  • 2.7 times less likely to have a yearly dental visit compared to those with insurance.
  • More likely to have more serious dental treatment such as tooth extractions and dentures than people with dental insurance.
  • Less likely to have basic dental care such as restorative care (fillings, crowns and bridges) and treatment for periodontal disease.
  • 67% more likely to have heart disease.
  • 50% more likely to have brittle and fragile bones (osteoporosis).
  • 29% more likely to have diabetes.

In comparison, those with dental insurance were:

  • 49% more likely to have visited the dentist for a check-up or cleaning in the last 6-months.
  • 42% more likely to take their children to visit a dentist twice per year.
  • 33% more likely to get periodontal maintenance treatment.

 

U.S. Dental insurance status, 2017

 
 

 

Data includes dental insurance coverage for 325,700,000 individuals in the United States with roughly 77 percent of Americans with some type of dental insurance and 23 percent of Americans without dental insurance. For more information: National Association of Dental Plans, Statistical Reports.

Source: Minnesota Department of Health, Health Economics Program. Minnesota Health Access Survey.

 

Compared to 2016, the percentage of Americans with dental benefits provided by public programs and employer or group programs increased, while the percentage of uninsured decreased.

In 2017, roughly 75 million Americans did not have dental insurance (23%) (compared to 35% in 2016). Of those 251 million Americans with dental insurance, most receive benefits through their employer or group programs like the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) (47%) (compared to 44% in 2016), followed by public programs (e.g. Medicaid/CHIP or TriCare for the military (26%) (compared to 15% in 2016), and private or non-group coverage (4%) (compared to 6% in 2016).

The American Dental Association, Health Policy Institute: Most Important Barriers to Dental Care are Financial, not Supply Related (PDF) reports that low-income, non-elderly adults have the highest levels of financial barriers to dental care in the United States. Until passage of the Affordable Care Act, the decline in state Medicaid adult dental benefits in the United States resulted in decreased dental visits and increased emergency room visits for dental conditions, especially among young adults.


 

Minnesotans without dental insurance, 2011 to 2017

 
 

 

Total sample size (2011) = 11,355, (2013) = 11,778, (2015) = 11,178 and (2017) = 12,436. Population estimates were based on the state’s population: (2011) = 5,348,562, (2013) = 5,418,521, (2015) = 5,482,435 and (2017) = 5,576,606 as shown in U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division; Table 1. Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for the United States, Regions, States, and Puerto Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2017 (NST-EST2017-01). Statistical weights were applied to dental insurance rates to ensure that survey results are representative of the state’s population.  See About the Minnesota Health Access Survey data for more information.

Source: Minnesota Department of Health, Health Economics Program. Minnesota Health Access Survey.

 

In 2011, 33% of Minnesotans reported not having dental insurance. The dental uninsurance rate dropped to 31% in 2013 and 26% in 2015, but rose slightly to 28% in 2017.


 

Minnesotans without dental insurance by age group, 2017

 
 

 

Total sample size = 11,178. Statistical weights were applied to dental insurance rates to ensure that survey results are representative of the state’s population. See About the Data: Minnesota Health Access Survey for more information.

Source: Minnesota Department of Health, Health Economics Program. Minnesota Health Access Survey.

 

In 2017, over half of Minnesotans aged 65 years and older reported not having dental insurance (53%).

Compared to Minnesotans of all ages, dental insurance coverage was significantly lower among older adults aged 65 and older and signifiantly higher among children 17 years and younger.


 

Minnesotans without dental insurance by race and ethnicity, 2017

 
 

 

All race or ethnicity categories include individuals who report their race or ethnicity alone or in combination with another race or ethnicity. Total sample size = 12,436. Statistical weights were applied to dental insurance rates to ensure that survey results are representative of the state’s population.  See About the Minnesota Health Access Survey data for more information.

Source: Minnesota Department of Health, Health Economics Program. Minnesota Health Access Survey.

 

In 2017, 23% of Asian, 23% of Black, 42% of American Indian, 28% of White and 34% of Hispanic Minnesotans reported not having dental insurance. Only the rate of Black Minnesotans was significantly different from the state rate.


 

Minnesotans without dental insurance by education, 2017

 
 

 

For children, education level refers to that of the parent. Total sample size = 12,436. Statistical weights were applied to dental insurance rates to ensure that survey results are representative of the state’s population. See About the Minnesota Health Access Survey data for more information.

Source: Minnesota Department of Health, Health Economics Program. Minnesota Health Access Survey.

 

In 2017, over one-third of Minnesotans with a high school degree (38%) or less than a high school degree (38%) reported not having dental insurance. In comparison, fewer individuals with some college (25%) and individuals with post college graduate education (21%) reported not having dental insurance.


 

Minnesotans without dental insurance by poverty guidelines, 2017

 
 

Total sample size = 12,436. Statistical weights were applied to dental insurance rates to ensure that survey results are representative of the state’s population. The Department of Health and Human Services defines the Federal Poverty Guidelines (FPG) each year for eligibility purposes of certain programs and benefits. Those above 400% of the federal poverty level have more income than those at or below 100%.  See About the Minnesota Health Access Survey data for more information.

Source: Minnesota Department of Health, Health Economics Program. Minnesota Health Access Survey.

 

In 2017, Minnesotans with 100% or below (lower income) were more likely to have dental insurance than those with incomes between 101 and 300% of the federal poverty guidelines, and Minnesotants above 400% (higher income) were more likely to have dental insurance that all othe income groups.

In 2017, a family of four at 100% of the federal poverty guidelines had a total yearly income of $24,600 and a family of four at 400% of the federal poverty guidelines had a total yearly income of $98,400.


 

Minnesotans without dental insurance by urban and rural residence, 2017

 
 

Total sample size = 12,436. Statistical weights were applied to dental insurance rates to ensure that survey results are representative of the state’s population. Rural and urban classifications are based on Rural/Urban Commuting-Area taxonomy (RUCA-zip) developed by the University of Washington, Rural Health Research Center and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. See About the Minnesota Health Access Survey data for more information.

Source: Minnesota Department of Health, Health Economics Program. Minnesota Health Access Survey.

 

In 2017, twice as many Minnesotans living in isolated rural areas (47%) reported not having dental insurance, compared to Minnesotans living in urban areas (23%).