Children's oral health problems

Past year oral health problems (toothaches, bleeding gums, decayed teeth or cavities) by:

 

We analyzed the prevalence of children’s oral health problems by sex, age group, race and ethnicity and special healthcare needs of the child. We also looked at household poverty, primary language spoken, parent and guardian education, health insurance and household poverty as possible factors associated with children’s oral health problems. Below we report on factors in Minnesota that are statistically significant.


Children's past year oral health problems, 2012 to 2016

 

Source: National Survey of Children's Health.

 

Children (1 to 17 years) with at least one oral health problem in the past year

2012

2016

 

United States

Percent

18.7%

13.4%

 

95% Confidence Interval

18.1 to 19.4

12.7 to 14.2

 

Number (sample size)

14,736

5,195

 

Estimated population

12,980,922

9,321,712

Minnesota

Percent

14.9%

9.6%

 

95% Confidence Interval

12.4 to 17.5

7.5 to 12.0

 

Number (sample size)

222

114

 

Estimated population

179,805

115,536

 

Data is based on a survey of parent or guardian reported measures of non-institutionalized children (i.e., children not in jail, prison or hospital setting). Total sample size: U.S. = 50,212 and Minnesota = 1,351. Unstable rate: use caution when interpreting rates based on a sample size less than 50 or an estimate with a 95% confidence interval width exceeding 20 percentage points or 1.2 times the estimate. Percentages are weighted to population characteristics. See About the National Survey of Children’s Health data for more information.

 

In 2016, there was a five percentage point decrease in U.S. and Minnesota children experiencing oral health problems (toothaches, bleeding gums or decayed teeth or cavities) within the past year, compared to 2012. However, survey methodology changes and smaller sample sizes in 2016 could explain the decrease.